Journal reflection

Your third project is a presentation or short paper (you are free to choose) that explores the question you posed at the end of your observation journal. With that question as your topic, you will explain why the answer to it is important to understanding yourself, other people, and the world around you, and how the social sciences have developed to help us answer these important questions. Be sure your actual question is apparent on the presentation or paper. Specifically, the following critical elements must be addressed in your submission: I. Explain why your question is important to you as a member of society. II. Detail the major developments in social science thinking that drive questions regarding studying the individual. Use course resources to back up your discussion. III. Explain how finding the answer to your question might impact others around you. For instance, who might be most invested in the answer? IV. Detail the major developments in social science thinking that drive questions regarding studying others. Use course resources to back up your discussion. V. Explain why studying human behavior and identity is a valuable human endeavor. VI. Detail the major developments in social science thinking that support the study and advancement of the social sciences as necessary and valuable. Use course resources to back up your discussion.

Question 

 

As a social scientist, the question that I would seek to answer is “How do human-animal relationships positively affect the human  species?” Observations from the advertisements can help unravel how human beings can establish a good interaction with animals. In addition, the smiles on the people’s faces when they come home to their pets, cradle rescued puppies in their arms or carry a wayward foal to safety speaks volumes. I know from my own experiences the joy I’ve felt from saving my first litter of kittens to fattening up  emancipated horses.  I’ve always said that animals don’t hurt people the way people hurt people and animals. Now that’s a good Social Science issue! And another question for social scientists to ask might be “Is there an approach parents and teachers can be take to ensure children learn to care for all animals rather harming them? Or how do we more positively influence our children when it comes to caring for all creatures?”

 

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